Spidering the Web
Creepy Crawlers and Engines That Search

Web Browser Comparison, Market Share and History

Web Browser Comparison Table

Not all web browsers are equal. Some are faster while others are more secure. One thing is for sure - everyone seems to have their own personal preference.

 Google ChromeMozilla FirefoxOperaMicrosoft EdgeSafari
PrivacyModerateHighModerateModerateLow
Built-in VPNNoNoYesNoNo
EngineBlinkGeckoBlinkBlinkWebKit
SpeedModerateFastModerateModerateModerate

Web Browser Market Share Graph

The graph below compares the market share of the most popular web browsers over-time.

 

Source: StatCounter Global Stats - Browser Market Share

Web Browser History Lesson

Netscape Navigator
During the early days of the World Wide Web (WWW) Netscape Navigator reigned supreme. The satisfaction of watching the animated Netscape N while web pages assembled was unparalleled.

Netscape dominated the 90s until acquired by AOL in 1999, which lacked the technical prowess needed to continue propelling the web browser forward. This event assisted with ushering in the dawn of Microsoft’s Internet Explorer web browser era.

Microsoft was also packaging IE with their Windows operating system at the time, which was later deemed as an antitrust violation. A decision that might have kept Netscape in the fray a bit longer had it not come long after it was far too late.

From the Ashes - A Firefox Rises

In 1997, Netscape Communicator was released and served as the building blocks for the Mozilla Application Suite, also developed by Netscape. The application suite was later renamed SeaMonkey and was utilized as the basis for a little known web browser only spin-off called Mozilla Firefox.

SeaMonkey remains today as community-maintained all-in-one Internet application suite containing a web-browser, e-mail, newsgroup and feed clients, IRC chat and HTML editor that retains much of Netscape’s former look and feel.

Netscape's Final Hour

AOL did attempt to bring Netscape back to life in 2007 with the release of Netscape Navigator 9. Although Netscape’s return was brief (AOL discontinued support in 2008), core components from Netscape Navigator were responsible for bringing about two efforts: SeaMonkey and Firefox.

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